short stature

Microcephaly 20, Primary, Autosomal Recessive

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Microphthalmia and optic nerve hypoplasia with "blindness" seem to be common.

Systemic Features: 

Short stature and global developmental delay are usually present.  Poor or absent speech is characteristic and intellectual disability may be severe.  Few individuals can walk.  Foot deformities and hypotonia are often present.  Behavior problems are common having features of ADHD, autism, and aggression.  Foot deformities have been noted. 

Imaging of the brain may reveal cerebellar hypoplasia, a simplified gyral pattern, and absence of the corpus callosum. 

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the KIF14 gene (1q32.1) are responsible for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic variants in KIF14 cause intellectual disability with microcephaly

Makrythanasis P, Maroofian R, Stray-Pedersen A, Musaev D, Zaki MS, Mahmoud IG, Selim L, Elbadawy A, Jhangiani SN, Coban Akdemir ZH, Gambin T, Sorte HS, Heiberg A, McEvoy-Venneri J, James KN, Stanley V, Belandres D, Guipponi M, Santoni FA, Ahangari N, Tara F, Doosti M, Iwaszkiewicz J, Zoete V, Backe PH, Hamamy H, Gleeson JG, Lupski JR, Karimiani EG, Antonarakis SE. Biallelic variants in KIF14 cause intellectual disability with microcephaly. Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 Mar;26(3):330-339.

PubMed ID: 
29343805

Mutations of KIF14 cause primary microcephaly by impairing cytokinesis

Moawia A, Shaheen R, Rasool S, Waseem SS, Ewida N, Budde B, Kawalia A, Motameny S, Khan K, Fatima A, Jameel M, Ullah F, Akram T, Ali Z, Abdullah U, Irshad S, Hohne W, Noegel AA, Al-Owain M, Hortnagel K, Stobe P, Baig SM, Nurnberg P, Alkuraya FS, Hahn A, Hussain MS. Mutations of KIF14 cause primary microcephaly by impairing cytokinesis. Ann Neurol. 2017 Oct;82(4):562-577.

PubMed ID: 
28892560

Myopathy, Mitochondrial Anomalies, and Ataxia

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Ocular findings are variable.  One of three individuals with compound heterozygous mutations had a pigmentary retinopathy with pallor of the optic nerve but no visual abnormalities.  Her sister had only optic nerve pallor.  The eyes are described as "small" and "close-set".

No ocular findings were reported for the family with autosomal dominant inheritance.

Systemic Features: 

Ataxia, short stature, and gait difficulties from an early age are consistent findings.  Some patients are never able to walk.  Motor development is generally delayed.  Truncal and limb ataxia is a feature.  Some degree of intellectual disability is generally present and speech is often delayed.  

The face is long with a myopathic appearance.  Both micrognathia and a prominent jaw may be seen.  The palate is highly arched.  Patients are described as hypotonic and there is generalized muscle weakness both proximal and distal.  Distal sensory impairment has been described in the family with presumed dominant inheritance and there may be psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia.  Dysmetria with dysdiadochokinesis is often present and a fine intention tremor has been observed.

Mitochondria in fibroblasts exhibit abnormal dynamics and occur in a fragmented network.  Muscle biopsies reveal changes consistent with myopathy.  Serum creatine kinase may be elevated.

Genetics

Compound heterozygous mutations in the MSTO1 gene (1q22) have been found in two families with 3 affected individuals suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance.  In a third family, heterozygous mutations in the same gene were found in a mother and 3 of her adult children, consistent with autosomal dominant transmission.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Neurodevelopmental Disorder With or Without Seizures and Gait Abnormalities

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Nystagmus and strabismus are common ocular features.  Optic nerve hypoplasia is present in some individuals.

Systemic Features: 

Symptoms may begin in early infancy or childhood.  Several neonates with irritability, hypertonia, increased startle reflexes, and stiffness have been reported.  Hypotonia may occur in the neonatal period though.  Intellectual disability and severe developmental delay are common and some patients are unable to follow simple commands.  Seizures of variable severity frequently occur at some point.  Speech may be absent.  Some patients are unable to walk while those that do have a clumsy, spastic gait.  Joint contractures may develop.

The most obvious dysmorphic feature are large ears.  Choreiform and stereotypic hand movements are sometimes present.  Feeding difficulties and sleeping problems may be noted.  Cortical atrophy and thinning of the corpus callosum has been seen on brain imaging.  One mildly affected individual was short in stature.

Genetics

Heterozygous mutations in the GRIA4 gene (11q22.3) have been found in 5 unrelated patients.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Joint Laxity, Short Stature, and Myopia

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Three of four brothers in one family had high myopia and two had retinal detachments as well as iris and chorioretinal colobomas.  In a second family with five sibs a teenage female was reported to have glaucoma and vision of legal blindness.  She and one brother had high myopia as well (parameters not reported).

Systemic Features: 

In one consanguineous family a brother and sister had multiple large joint dislocations including elbows, hips, knees and ankles.  The sister exhibited severe kyphoscoliosis while her brother had only mild kyphosis.  A single individual in each of the two sibships had hearing loss.

Three brothers in another consanguineous family had joint laxity and mild pectus carinatum.

Short stature was noted in all 5 affected individuals.  Cognitive development was reported as normal.

Genetics

Five individuals from 2 consanguineous Saudi sibships have been reported.  Homozygous mutations in the GZF1 gene (20p11.21) segregated as expected for an autosomal recessive disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.   Retinal detachment surgery and joint dislocation reduction should be considered in appropriate individuals.

References
Article Title: 

GZF1 Mutations Expand the Genetic Heterogeneity of Larsen Syndrome

Patel N, Shamseldin HE, Sakati N, Khan AO, Softa A, Al-Fadhli FM, Hashem M, Abdulwahab FM, Alshidi T, Alomar R, Alobeid E, Wakil SM, Colak D, Alkuraya FS. GZF1 Mutations Expand the Genetic Heterogeneity of Larsen Syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 May 4;100(5):831-836.

PubMed ID: 
28475863

3MC Syndromes

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

The major ocular features involve the periocular structures.  These result in the typical facial dysmorphism and include hypertelorism, blepharoptosis, blepharophimosis, and highly arched eyebrows. Ptosis, unilateral or bilateral, can be present.

One patient was reported to have unilateral aniridia and a corneal leucoma.  Tear duct atresia was reported in another individual.

Systemic Features: 

Systemic features are highly variable in their presence and severity.   Facial clefting, growth deficiency, cognitive impairment, and hearing loss are present about half the time in some combination while craniosynostosis, urogenital anomalies, and radioulnar synostosis are seen in about a third of individuals.  More rare features include cardiac defects and abdominal midline defects (omphalocele and diastasis recti).

Genetics

This condition (3MC) is now postulated to include at least 3 disorders (Malpuech-Michels-Mingarelli-Carnevale syndromes) and considered here as a single autosomal recessive disease complex with overlapping clinical features that requires genotyping for diagnostic separation.  These are: 3MC1 syndrome (257920) resulting from homozygous mutations in the MASP1 gene (3q27.3), 3MC2 syndrome (265050) caused by mutations in the COLEC11 gene (2p25.3) and 3MC3 (248340) with mutations in the COLEC10 gene (8q24.12).

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No effective general treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

COLEC10 is mutated in 3MC patients and regulates early craniofacial development

Munye MM, Diaz-Font A, Ocaka L, Henriksen ML, Lees M, Brady A, Jenkins D, Morton J, Hansen SW, Bacchelli C, Beales PL, Hernandez-Hernandez V. COLEC10 is mutated in 3MC patients and regulates early craniofacial development. PLoS Genet. 2017 Mar 16;13(3):e1006679. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006679. eCollection 2017 Mar.

PubMed ID: 
28301481

Mutations in lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome

Rooryck C, Diaz-Font A, Osborn DP, Chabchoub E, Hernandez-Hernandez V, Shamseldin H, Kenny J, Waters A, Jenkins D, Kaissi AA, Leal GF, Dallapiccola B, Carnevale F, Bitner-Glindzicz M, Lees M, Hennekam R, Stanier P, Burns AJ, Peeters H, Alkuraya FS, Beales PL. Mutations in lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome. Nat Genet. 2011 Mar;43(3):197-203.

PubMed ID: 
21258343

Ayme-Gripp Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Most patients have congenital cataracts which may be mild and "oil drop" in appearance.  The eyes appear far apart, the eyebrows are broad, and the palpebral fissures may slant upward or downward.  Ptosis has been reported.  Aphakic glaucoma has been reported in one juvenile who had unilateral cataract surgery at 5 months of age.

Systemic Features: 

The phenotype is heterogeneous and not all patients have all features.  The facial features are said to resemble those of the Down syndrome with brachycephaly, a high forehead, and a flat midface with shallow orbits and malar hypoplasia.  The ears are small, low-set, and posteriorly rotated.  The nose is short and the nasal bridge is broad and flat.  The mouth is small and the upper lip is thin.  The scalp hair may be sparse and the nails sometimes appear dystrophic.

The fingers are sometimes brachydactylous and tapered.  Short stature is common and the joints may have limited motion.  Dislocation of the radial heads is seen rarely while radioulnar synostosis has been seen in a few individuals.  Postnatal short stature is common.

Seizures often occur.  The ventricles appear large and cerebral atrophy has been reported.  Intellectual disability and mental retardation are common. However, at least one individual attended university although he had been diagnosed in childhood with Asberger disease.   Neurosensory hearing loss is common.

Genetics

This autosomal dominant condition results from heterozygous mutations in the MAF (16q32.2) gene.  At least one mother/son transmission event has been reported.

Many of the same features are seen in what has been called the Fine-Lubinsky syndrome (601353) but without mutations in the MAF gene.  It may not be a unique disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No general treatment has been reported but specific anomalies such as cataracts should be addressed.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

Niceta M, Stellacci E, Gripp KW, Zampino G, Kousi M, Anselmi M, Traversa A, Ciolfi A, Stabley D, Bruselles A, Caputo V, Cecchetti S, Prudente S, Fiorenza MT, Boitani C, Philip N, Niyazov D, Leoni C, Nakane T, Keppler-Noreuil K, Braddock SR, Gillessen-Kaesbach G, Palleschi A, Campeau PM, Lee BH, Pouponnot C, Stella L, Bocchinfuso G, Katsanis N, Sol-Church K, Tartaglia M. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies. Am J Hum Genet. 2015 May 7;96(5):816-25.

PubMed ID: 
25865493

Retinitis Pigmentosa With or Without Skeletal Anomalies

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Downward slanting lid fissures may be detectable at birth as part of the general craniofacial dysmorphism.  Some degree of night blindness causes symptoms by the second decade of life and constricted visual fields with pigmented retinopathy and vessel narrowing can be detected.  The ERG shows reduced or absent responses.  The retinal phenotype is progressive.   

Systemic Features: 

Most but not all patients have skeletal anomalies.  Nonspecific craniofacial dysmorphology features are frequently present including frontal bossing, macrocephaly, low-set ears, large columella, hypoplastic nares, and malar hypoplasia.  A short neck, brachydactyly, and overall shortness of stature are often present.  Some individuals have nail dysplasia.  The proximal femoral metaphyses sometimes show chondrodysplasia.

There is often some degree of intellectual disability and there may be delays in speech, feeding, and walking.

Genetics

This disorder results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the CWC27 gene (5q12.3).

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No general treatment has been reported.  Low vision aids and night vision devices may be helpful, especially for educational activities.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in the Spliceosome Component CWC27 Cause Retinal Degeneration with or without Additional Developmental Anomalies

Xu M, Xie YA, Abouzeid H, Gordon CT, Fiorentino A, Sun Z, Lehman A, Osman IS, Dharmat R, Riveiro-Alvarez R, Bapst-Wicht L, Babino D, Arno G, Busetto V, Zhao L, Li H, Lopez-Martinez MA, Azevedo LF, Hubert L, Pontikos N, Eblimit A, Lorda-Sanchez I, Kheir V, Plagnol V, Oufadem M, Soens ZT, Yang L, Bole-Feysot C, Pfundt R, Allaman-Pillet N, Nitschke P, Cheetham ME, Lyonnet S, Agrawal SA, Li H, Pinton G, Michaelides M, Besmond C, Li Y, Yuan Z, von Lintig J, Webster AR, Le Hir H, Stoilov P; UK Inherited Retinal Dystrophy Consortium., Amiel J, Hardcastle AJ, Ayuso C, Sui R, Chen R, Allikmets R, Schorderet DF. Mutations in the Spliceosome Component CWC27 Cause Retinal Degeneration with or without Additional Developmental Anomalies. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Apr 6;100(4):592-604.

PubMed ID: 
28285769

SHORT Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Deeply set eyes are frequently noted and perhaps are a result of the lipodystrophy.  Anterior segment abnormalities resembling Rieger anomalies are often associated with congenital glaucoma. 

Systemic Features: 

There is considerable clinical heterogeneity.  The facial gestalt, however, is said to be characteristic.  These are: triangular progeroid facies with a prominent forehead, absence of facial fat, midface hypoplasia, and hypoplastic nasal alae.  Insulin resistance seems to be a consistent feature as well and nephrocalcinosis is common.  Serum and urinary calcium may be elevated even in infancy.

Teeth are late to erupt and bone age is delayed with shortness of stature the final result in many cases.  Joints are often hyperextensible.  A neurosensory hear loss has been found in some individuals.  Notably, developmental milestones are usually timely although mild cognitive delays are rarely seen and speech may be delayed.  Inguinal hernias are part of the syndrome. 

Genetics

Heterozygous mutations in the PIK3R1 gene (5q31.1) are responsible for this syndrome.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Serum and urinary calcium should be monitored.  The risk of glaucoma is high and patients should be monitored and treated appropriately.  Blood sugar and insulin levels may require treatment.  Inguinal hernias may require surgical repair.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in PIK3R1 cause SHORT syndrome

Dyment DA, Smith AC, Alcantara D, Schwartzentruber JA, Basel-Vanagaite L, Curry CJ, Temple IK, Reardon W, Mansour S, Haq MR, Gilbert R, Lehmann OJ, Vanstone MR, Beaulieu CL; FORGE Canada Consortium., Majewski J, Bulman DE, O'Driscoll M, Boycott KM, Innes AM. Mutations in PIK3R1 cause SHORT syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2013 Jul 11;93(1):158-66. 

PubMed ID: 
23810382

Muscular Dystrophy, Congenital, with Cataracts and Intellectual Disability

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Cataracts have been diagnosed by 6 months of age and may be congenital in origin. Several patients have had strabismus.

Systemic Features: 

Progressive muscle weakness begins in early childhood.  Hypotonia is usually present at birth followed by atrophy of the proximal muscles (especially in the lower limbs).  Muscle weakness progresses for several years and may stabilize but not before severe gait difficulties occur.  Most adult patients are confined to a wheelchair.  No cardiac involvement occurs although respiratory weakness is often present.  Serum creatine kinase is usually elevated and biopsied muscle fibers show dystrophic changes and increased variability in fiber size with vacuolization.

Other signs in some individuals are contractures, scoliosis, seizures, short stature, cognitive deficits (usually mild), and spinal rigidity.  Paradoxically, some patients have limb spasticity and hyperreflexia with pyramidal signs.  No cerebellar signs are present.

Genetics

This condition results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the INPP5K gene (17p13).  

See Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome for a disorder with a somewhat similar clinical presentation plus cerebellar signs.  It is caused by a different mutation, however.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Cataracts have been surgically removed in several patients by the age of two years.  Physical therapy may be beneficial.  Selected individuals could benefit from release of contractures.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in INPP5K, Encoding a Phosphoinositide 5-Phosphatase, Cause Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Cataracts and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Wiessner M, Roos A, Munn CJ, Viswanathan R, Whyte T, Cox D, Schoser B, Sewry C, Roper H, Phadke R, Marini Bettolo C, Barresi R, Charlton R, Bonnemann CG, Abath Neto O, Reed UC, Zanoteli E, Araujo Martins Moreno C, Ertl-Wagner B, Stucka R, De Goede C, Borges da Silva T, Hathazi D, Dell'Aica M, Zahedi RP, Thiele S, Muller J, Kingston H, Muller S, Curtis E, Walter MC, Strom TM, Straub V, Bushby K, Muntoni F, Swan LE, Lochmuller H, Senderek J. Mutations in INPP5K, Encoding a Phosphoinositide 5-Phosphatase, Cause Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Cataracts and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Mar 2;100(3):523-536.

PubMed ID: 
28190456

Mutations in INPP5K Cause a Form of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Overlapping Marinesco-Sjögren Syndrome and Dystroglycanopathy

Osborn DP, Pond HL, Mazaheri N, Dejardin J, Munn CJ, Mushref K, Cauley ES, Moroni I, Pasanisi MB, Sellars EA, Hill RS, Partlow JN, Willaert RK, Bharj J, Malamiri RA, Galehdari H, Shariati G, Maroofian R, Mora M, Swan LE, Voit T, Conti FJ, Jamshidi Y, Manzini MC. Mutations in INPP5K Cause a Form of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Overlapping Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome and Dystroglycanopathy. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Mar 2;100(3):537-545.

PubMed ID: 
28190459

Cataracts, Congenital, With Short Stature and Minor Skeletal Anomalies

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Early-onset cataracts are the main ocular feature of this syndrome.  A nonconsanguineous Korean family with 4 affected individuals has been reported.  Cataracts were diagnosed at various ages, including one adult, one juvenile, and one infant.  All had horizontal nystagmus and reduced vision even after surgical removal of the lenses.  

Systemic Features: 

Macrocephaly and short stature are consistent features.  Brachydactyly of the fingers is usually present.  The feet are described as "flat" and contain accessory navicular bones.

Genetics

A 3 generation Korean family with 4 affected members has been reported.  Three living members and a deceased grandfather had cataracts in an autosomal dominant pattern.  A mutation in the BRD4 gene (19p12.12) mutation segregated with the cataract phenotype.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Surgical removal of the cataractous lenses may be helpful in selected individuals but amblyopia is likely present as postoperative vision may remain below normal.

References
Article Title: 

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