nystagmus

Neurodevelopmental Disorder With or Without Seizures and Gait Abnormalities

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Nystagmus and strabismus are common ocular features.  Optic nerve hypoplasia is present in some individuals.

Systemic Features: 

Symptoms may begin in early infancy or childhood.  Several neonates with irritability, hypertonia, increased startle reflexes, and stiffness have been reported.  Hypotonia may occur in the neonatal period though.  Intellectual disability and severe developmental delay are common and some patients are unable to follow simple commands.  Seizures of variable severity frequently occur at some point.  Speech may be absent.  Some patients are unable to walk while those that do have a clumsy, spastic gait.  Joint contractures may develop.

The most obvious dysmorphic feature are large ears.  Choreiform and stereotypic hand movements are sometimes present.  Feeding difficulties and sleeping problems may be noted.  Cortical atrophy and thinning of the corpus callosum has been seen on brain imaging.  One mildly affected individual was short in stature.

Genetics

Heterozygous mutations in the GRIA4 gene (11q22.3) have been found in 5 unrelated patients.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Neurodevelopmental Disorder, Mitochondrial, with Abnormal Movements and Lactic Acidosis

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy is sometimes present.  Nystagmus, and strabismus are seen in some patients.  A pigmentary retinopathy was found in one individual.

Systemic Features: 

This is a clinically heterogeneous disorder with extensive neurological deficits.  Patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties from the neonatal period.  There is intrauterine growth retardation and postnatally patients usually exhibit psychomotor delays and intellectual disabilities.  Some develop seizures and few achieve normal developmental milestones.  Axial hypotonia is present from early infancy and most patients have muscle weakness and atrophy.  However, there may be spastic quadriplegia which is often associated with dysmetria, tremor, and athetosis.  Ataxia eventually develops in most patients. 

Brain imaging shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, enlarged ventricles, white matter defects, and delayed myelination. 

Incomplete metabolic studies suggest there may be abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity in at least some tissues.  Most patients have an elevated serum lactate.

Death in childhood is common.

Genetics

Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the WARS2 gene have been found in several families with this condition.  The considerable variation in the phenotype may at least partially be explained by the fact that an additional variant in the W13G gene is sometimes present which impairs normal localization of the WARS2 gene product within mitochondria.

The transmission pattern in several families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported for the general condition.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic variants in WARS2 encoding mitochondrial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthase in six individuals with mitochondrial encephalopathy

Wortmann SB, Timal S, Venselaar H, Wintjes LT, Kopajtich R, Feichtinger RG, Onnekink C, Muhlmeister M, Brandt U, Smeitink JA, Veltman JA, Sperl W, Lefeber D, Pruijn G, Stojanovic V, Freisinger P, V Spronsen F, Derks TG, Veenstra-Knol HE, Mayr JA, Rotig A, Tarnopolsky M, Prokisch H, Rodenburg RJ. Biallelic variants in WARS2 encoding mitochondrial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthase in six individuals with mitochondrial encephalopathy. Hum Mutat. 2017 Dec;38(12):1786-1795.

PubMed ID: 
28905505

Hypotonia, Infantile, with Psychomotor Retardation And Characteristic Facies 2

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Anomalies of periocular structures are part of the characteristic facial morphology.  The lid fissures slant downward and epicanthal folds are with ptosis are generally present.  Strabismus and nystagmus are characteristic features.

Systemic Features: 

This is a severe congenital neurodevelopmental disorder with global delay, hypotonia, and characteristic facies.  It is usually present at birth and soon manifest as a profound intellectual delay.  Most patients do not develop speech or independent motor skills.  Feeding difficulties are evident early and often require gastric tube placement for nutrition.  Failure to thrive is common.   Most patients have seizures of a tonic-clonic or atonic type which may be controlled with medication. 

Microcephaly, brachycephaly, plagiocephaly, and brachycephaly have been described.  A high forehead with frontal bossing, facial hypotonia, triangular facies have been described.  The ears are low-set and posteriorly rotated.  The upper lip is often thin and the mouth is commonly open.  The neck appears short, the nose is bulbous while the nasal bridge is prominent and the nares may be anteverted.

Brain imaging is normal in some patients but there is evidence of generalized cerebral atrophy, with a thin corpus callosum and decreased myelination in others.  Variable features include scoliosis, hip contractures, muscle wasting, and dyskinesias are sometimes seen.

Genetics

This disorder is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the UNC80 gene (2q34).  

For somewhat similar disorders see IHPRF1 (615419) and IHPRF3 (616900).

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability

Stray-Pedersen A, Cobben JM, Prescott TE, Lee S, Cang C, Aranda K, Ahmed S, Alders M, Gerstner T, Aslaksen K, Tetreault M, Qin W, Hartley T, Jhangiani SN, Muzny DM, Tarailo-Graovac M, van Karnebeek CD; Care4Rare Canada Consortium; Baylor-Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics, Lupski JR, Ren D, Yoon G. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Jan 7;98(1):202-9.

PubMed ID: 
26708751

UNC80 mutation causes a syndrome of hypotonia, severe intellectual disability, dyskinesia and dysmorphism, similar to that caused by mutations in its interacting cation channel NALCN

Perez Y, Kadir R, Volodarsky M, Noyman I, Flusser H, Shorer Z, Gradstein L, Birnbaum RY, Birk OS. UNC80 mutation causes a syndrome of hypotonia, severe intellectual disability, dyskinesia and dysmorphism, similar to that caused by mutations in its interacting cation channel NALCN. J Med Genet. 2016 Jun;53(6):397-402.

PubMed ID: 
26545877

Combined Oxidative Phosphorylation Deficiency 32

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Ocular signs are common but variable.  Patients may not make eye contact and sometimes have disconjugate eye movements.  Strabismus (usually exotropia) and nystagmus or often present.

Systemic Features: 

Six patients from 4 unrelated families of mixed ethnic backgrounds have been reported.  Infants within the first 4 to 6 months of life had evidence of developmental delay and neurodevelopmental regression.  Poor feeding and breathing difficulties are often noted in this period.  Other later signs are axial hypotonia, abnormal movements such as tremor, spasticity, hyperkinetic movements, dystonia with eventual regression of milestones.  Joint contractures and kyphoscoliosis may develop. 

Microcephaly was noted in several infants and brain imaging in all patients reveals abnormal T2- weighted signals in the brainstem and specifically in the basal ganglia.  Decreased activity in muscle mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, and IV has been documented.  Lactate may be increased in serum and the CSF.  Postmortem studies show brain vascular proliferation and gliosis in basal structures.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in MRPS34 (16p13.3) are the basis for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic Mutations in MRPS34 Lead to Instability of the Small Mitoribosomal Subunit and Leigh Syndrome

Lake NJ, Webb BD, Stroud DA, Richman TR, Ruzzenente B, Compton AG, Mountford HS, Pulman J, Zangarelli C, Rio M, Bodaert N, Assouline Z, Sherpa MD, Schadt EE, Houten SM, Byrnes J, McCormick EM, Zolkipli-Cunningham Z, Haude K, Zhang Z, Retterer K, Bai R, Calvo SE, Mootha VK, Christodoulou J, Rotig A, Filipovska A, Cristian I, Falk MJ, Metodiev MD, Thorburn DR. Biallelic Mutations in MRPS34 Lead to Instability of the Small Mitoribosomal Subunit and Leigh Syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Aug 3;101(2):239-254.

PubMed ID: 
28777931

Spastic Ataxia 8, Autosomal Recessive, with Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Reported ocular signs are limited to abnormal eye movements.  In other forms of spastic ataxia, nystagmus is evident in association with optic atrophy but no fundus examinations are reported in the 3 families with SPAX8.  Hypometric saccades and limited upgaze have also been found in these families.

Systemic Features: 

First signs and symptoms occur sometime in the first 5 years of life and often in the first year.   In 6 of 7 reported patients the presenting sign was nystagmus but one individual with reported onset of disease at age 5 years presented with ataxia.  Cerebellar signs, both truncal and limb, are usually present and the majority of individuals have evidence of dystonia.  Likewise, pyramidal signs are nearly always present.  Cerebellar dysarthria and titubation are often present with dystonic posturing and torticollis. 

Brain MRIs usually reveal cerebellar atrophy and widespread hypomyelination.  Two individuals in a single family had severe global psychomotor delays as well.  No sensory deficits were reported.  This disorder is progressive and patients in adulthood may require the use of a wheelchair.

Genetics

Homozygous mutations in the NKX6-2 (NKX6-2) gene (10q26.3) are responsible for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported for the general condition.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in NKX6-2 Cause Progressive Spastic Ataxia and Hypomyelination

Chelban V, Patel N, Vandrovcova J, Zanetti MN, Lynch DS, Ryten M, Botia JA, Bello O, Tribollet E, Efthymiou S, Davagnanam I; SYNAPSE Study Group, Bashiri FA, Wood NW, Rothman JE, Alkuraya FS, Houlden H. Mutations in NKX6-2 Cause Progressive Spastic Ataxia and Hypomyelination. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Jun 1;100(6):969-977.

PubMed ID: 
28575651

Neurodevelopmental Disorder with Progressive Microcephaly, Spasticity, and Brain Anomalies

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

 Examined patients have optic atrophy with nystagmus and roving eye movements.

Systemic Features: 

There are extensive and, in most cases, progressive CNS abnormalities resulting in severe neurodevelopmental deficits.  Infants at birth have progressive truncal hypotonia and limb spasticity.  Motor deficits result in little spontaneous movement, resulting in poor sucking, and respiratory difficulties.  Language does not develop and there is profound mental retardation. Progressive microcephaly is a characteristic finding.  There are often extrapyramidal signs such as rigidity and dystonic posturing.

Dysmorphic features include a short nose, high-arched palate, low-set and posteriorly rotated ears, micrognathia, postaxial polydactyly, hirsutism, pectus carinatum, contractures of large joints, and hyperextensibility of small joints.

Brain imaging shows a progressive leukoencephalopathy, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, and delayed myelination.  The corpus callosum is often thin and the ventricles appear enlarged.  The lifespan is generally short with death occurring in infancy or early childhood.

Genetics

This autosomal recessive disorder results from homozygous mutations in the PLAA gene (9p21). 

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins

Hall EA, Nahorski MS, Murray LM, Shaheen R, Perkins E, Dissanayake KN, Kristaryanto Y, Jones RA, Vogt J, Rivagorda M, Handley MT, Mali GR, Quidwai T, Soares DC, Keighren MA, McKie L, Mort RL, Gammoh N, Garcia-Munoz A, Davey T, Vermeren M, Walsh D, Budd P, Aligianis IA, Faqeih E, Quigley AJ, Jackson IJ, Kulathu Y, Jackson M, Ribchester RR, von Kriegsheim A, Alkuraya FS, Woods CG, Maher ER, Mill P. PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 May 4;100(5):706-724.

PubMed ID: 
28413018

Phospholipase A2-activating protein is associated with a novel form of leukoencephalopathy

Falik Zaccai TC, Savitzki D, Zivony-Elboum Y, Vilboux T, Fitts EC, Shoval Y, Kalfon L, Samra N, Keren Z, Gross B, Chasnyk N, Straussberg R, Mullikin JC, Teer JK, Geiger D, Kornitzer D, Bitterman-Deutsch O, Samson AO, Wakamiya M, Peterson JW, Kirtley ML, Pinchuk IV, Baze WB, Gahl WA, Kleta R, Anikster Y, Chopra AK. Phospholipase A2-activating protein is associated with a novel form of leukoencephalopathy. Brain. 2017 Feb;140(Pt 2):370-386.

PubMed ID: 
28007986

Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia 7

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

The ocular phenotype has not been fully evaluated.  Optic atrophy, nystagmus, and strabismus have been reported in addition to dysmorphic periocular features such as epicanthal folds, upslanting lid fissures, and a flattened nasal bridge.  Infants frequently do not fix and follow.

Systemic Features: 

Infants may be small at birth and subsequent psychomotor development is delayed.  The ears are large and the palate is highly arched.  Hypotonia is present from birth but spasticity with hyperreflexia may also be seen.  Brain imaging may show a thin corpus callosum as well as olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia.  The ventricles are frequently enlarged.  Patients are frequently irritable with few spontaneous movements.

Genitalia can be ambiguous and are frequently assigned to the female gender because of microphallus, fused scrotum, absent testes, and absence of the uterus.  Many such infants are found to have XY karyotypes.  Infants considered male at birth may subsequently show regression of penile corporeal tissue and may have genitalia that more closely resemble the female gender.  Pelvic imaging and laparoscopy, however, may reveal a uterus, Fallopian tubes and a blind-ending vagina with no gonadal tissue even in individuals with XY karyotypes. 

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the TOE1 gene (1p34.1) are responsible for this condition.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic mutations in the 3' exonuclease TOE1 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia and uncover a role in snRNA processing

Lardelli RM, Schaffer AE, Eggens VR, Zaki MS, Grainger S, Sathe S, Van Nostrand EL, Schlachetzki Z, Rosti B, Akizu N, Scott E, Silhavy JL, Heckman LD, Rosti RO, Dikoglu E, Gregor A, Guemez-Gamboa A, Musaev D, Mande R, Widjaja A, Shaw TL, Markmiller S, Marin-Valencia I, Davies JH, de Meirleir L, Kayserili H, Altunoglu U, Freckmann ML, Warwick L, Chitayat D, Blaser S, Caglayan AO, Bilguvar K, Per H, Fagerberg C, Christesen HT, Kibaek M, Aldinger KA, Manchester D, Matsumoto N, Muramatsu K, Saitsu H, Shiina M, Ogata K, Foulds N, Dobyns WB, Chi NC, Traver D, Spaccini L, Bova SM, Gabriel SB, Gunel M, Valente EM, Nassogne MC, Bennett EJ, Yeo GW, Baas F, Lykke-Andersen J, Gleeson JG. Biallelic mutations in the 3' exonuclease TOE1 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia and uncover a role in snRNA processing. Nat Genet. 2017 Mar;49(3):457-464.

PubMed ID: 
28092684

Cataracts, Congenital, With Short Stature and Minor Skeletal Anomalies

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Early-onset cataracts are the main ocular feature of this syndrome.  A nonconsanguineous Korean family with 4 affected individuals has been reported.  Cataracts were diagnosed at various ages, including one adult, one juvenile, and one infant.  All had horizontal nystagmus and reduced vision even after surgical removal of the lenses.  

Systemic Features: 

Macrocephaly and short stature are consistent features.  Brachydactyly of the fingers is usually present.  The feet are described as "flat" and contain accessory navicular bones.

Genetics

A 3 generation Korean family with 4 affected members has been reported.  Three living members and a deceased grandfather had cataracts in an autosomal dominant pattern.  A mutation in the BRD4 gene (19p12.12) mutation segregated with the cataract phenotype.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Surgical removal of the cataractous lenses may be helpful in selected individuals but amblyopia is likely present as postoperative vision may remain below normal.

References
Article Title: 

Spastic Paraplegia, Intellectual Disability, Nystagmus, and Obesity

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Patients have deep-set eyes with nystagmus, reduced vision, and often an esotropia perhaps secondary to hypermetropia.  In one of 3 reported patients the optic discs were described pale.

Systemic Features: 

Prominent foreheads are present at birth along with full cheeks and a prominent forehead.  Children grow rapidly in the first year eventually reaching the 90th percentiles in weight, height, and head circumference although neurologically they are developmentally delayed.  Speech and walking may be delayed as well.  While limbs have increased tone together with hyperreflexia, the trunk exhibits hypotonia.

Brain imaging reveals delayed myelination, dilated lateral ventricles, reduced while matter, and cerebral atrophy.

Genetics

Heterozygous mutations in the KIDINS220 gene (2p25.1) have been identified in 3 unrelated patients.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Heterozygous KIDINS220/ARMS nonsense variants cause spastic paraplegia, intellectual disability, nystagmus, and obesity

Josifova DJ, Monroe GR, Tessadori F, de Graaff E, van der Zwaag B, Mehta SG; DDD Study., Harakalova M, Duran KJ, Savelberg SM, Nijman IJ, Jungbluth H, Hoogenraad CC, Bakkers J, Knoers NV, Firth HV, Beales PL, van Haaften G, van Haelst MM. Heterozygous KIDINS220/ARMS nonsense variants cause spastic paraplegia, intellectual disability, nystagmus, and obesity. Hum Mol Genet. 2016 Jun 1;25(11):2158-2167.

PubMed ID: 
27005418

Spastic Paraplegia 78

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Reduced upgaze with nystagmus and strabismus have been reported.  

Systemic Features: 

This progressive neurodegenerative disorder usually has its onset in young adults but the signs and symptoms are highly variable.  Ambulation and gait difficulties combined with spasticity and lower limb weakness are common signs.  Ataxia and dysarthria are also important signs.  Some individuals have dementia while others have only mild cognitive impairment.  Some individuals have mild signs of Parkinsonism.

Brain imaging may show cerebellar and cortical atrophy with a thin corpus callosum. 

Genetics

This condition results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP13A2 gene (1p36.13).

The same gene is also mutated in the Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (606693), an early-onset form of Parkinsonism.  

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78)

Estrada-Cuzcano A, Martin S, Chamova T, Synofzik M, Timmann D, Holemans T, Andreeva A, Reichbauer J, De Rycke R, Chang DI, van Veen S, Samuel J, Schols L, Poppel T, Mollerup Sorensen D, Asselbergh B, Klein C, Zuchner S, Jordanova A, Vangheluwe P, Tournev I, Schule R. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78). Brain. 2017 Feb;140(Pt 2):287-305.

PubMed ID: 
28137957

Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

Kara E, Tucci A, Manzoni C, Lynch DS, Elpidorou M, Bettencourt C, Chelban V, Manole A, Hamed SA, Haridy NA, Federoff M, Preza E, Hughes D, Pittman A, Jaunmuktane Z, Brandner S, Xiromerisiou G, Wiethoff S, Schottlaender L, Proukakis C, Morris H, Warner T, Bhatia KP, Korlipara LV, Singleton AB, Hardy J, Wood NW, Lewis PA, Houlden H. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain. 2016 Jul;139(Pt 7):1904-18.

PubMed ID: 
27217339

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