seizures

Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia 11

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Some patients are reported to have poor eye contact, hyperopia, and strabismus.  Three individuals had colobomas.  Strabismus, poor eye contact, and hyperopia have been noted in some individuals.   

Systemic Features: 

Microcephaly and large ears may be noted at birth.  Some patients have general hypotonia while others have spastic hypertonia.  Neurological features include markedly delayed psychomotor development, truncal and appendicular ataxia, and cognitive delays.  Developmental milestones such as walking, sitting, and speech are delayed.  Some patients have seizures.  A variety of behavior abnormalities have been reported including stereotypical movements, autistic behavior, repetitive motor movements, and poor communication.  Dysarthria and dysphagia are sometimes present.  There seems to be little progression of the neurological manifestations.

Brain MRIs reveal cerebellar hypoplasia and hypoplasia or agenesis of the corpus callosum in most patients.

Genetics

Homozygous mutations in the TBC1D23 gene (3q12.1q12.2) cause this disorder

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Homozygous Truncating Variants in TBC1D23 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Alter Cortical Development

Ivanova EL, Mau-Them FT, Riazuddin S, Kahrizi K, Laugel V, Schaefer E, de Saint Martin A, Runge K, Iqbal Z, Spitz MA, Laura M, Drouot N, Gerard B, Deleuze JF, de Brouwer APM, Razzaq A, Dollfus H, Assir MZ, Nitchke P, Hinckelmann MV, Ropers H, Riazuddin S, Najmabadi H, van Bokhoven H, Chelly J. Homozygous Truncating Variants in TBC1D23 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Alter Cortical Development. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Sep 7;101(3):428-440.

PubMed ID: 
28823707

Encephalopathy, Progressive, Early-Onset, wtih Brain Atrophy and Spasticity

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy or cortical visual impairment with lack of visual tracking have been described in all patients.

Systemic Features: 

Microcephaly is evident at birth with global developmental delay and hearing loss.  One patient of 3 reported in 2 unrelated families had brief flexion seizures at 5 months.  Developmental regression and stagnation may become evident within the first months of life.  The EEG showed a hypsarrhythmia pattern.  Truncal hypotonia, spasticity, dystonia and/or myoclonus, scoliosis, and dysphagia are also features.  Two of the three reported patients had seizures. 

Brain MRI showed a pattern of pontine hypoplasia, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, modified frontal gyri and diffuse cortical atrophy with enlarged ventricles have been described.  The cerebellum seems to be spared.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the TRAPPC12 gene (2p25.3) were found in 3 children in 2 unrelated families with this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Ayme-Gripp Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Most patients have congenital cataracts which may be mild and "oil drop" in appearance.  The eyes appear far apart, the eyebrows are broad, and the palpebral fissures may slant upward or downward.  Ptosis has been reported.  Aphakic glaucoma has been reported in one juvenile who had unilateral cataract surgery at 5 months of age.

Systemic Features: 

The phenotype is heterogeneous and not all patients have all features.  The facial features are said to resemble those of the Down syndrome with brachycephaly, a high forehead, and a flat midface with shallow orbits and malar hypoplasia.  The ears are small, low-set, and posteriorly rotated.  The nose is short and the nasal bridge is broad and flat.  The mouth is small and the upper lip is thin.  The scalp hair may be sparse and the nails sometimes appear dystrophic.

The fingers are sometimes brachydactylous and tapered.  Short stature is common and the joints may have limited motion.  Dislocation of the radial heads is seen rarely while radioulnar synostosis has been seen in a few individuals.  Postnatal short stature is common.

Seizures often occur.  The ventricles appear large and cerebral atrophy has been reported.  Intellectual disability and mental retardation are common. However, at least one individual attended university although he had been diagnosed in childhood with Asberger disease.   Neurosensory hearing loss is common.

Genetics

This autosomal dominant condition results from heterozygous mutations in the MAF (16q32.2) gene.  At least one mother/son transmission event has been reported.

Many of the same features are seen in what has been called the Fine-Lubinsky syndrome (601353) but without mutations in the MAF gene.  It may not be a unique disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No general treatment has been reported but specific anomalies such as cataracts should be addressed.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

Niceta M, Stellacci E, Gripp KW, Zampino G, Kousi M, Anselmi M, Traversa A, Ciolfi A, Stabley D, Bruselles A, Caputo V, Cecchetti S, Prudente S, Fiorenza MT, Boitani C, Philip N, Niyazov D, Leoni C, Nakane T, Keppler-Noreuil K, Braddock SR, Gillessen-Kaesbach G, Palleschi A, Campeau PM, Lee BH, Pouponnot C, Stella L, Bocchinfuso G, Katsanis N, Sol-Church K, Tartaglia M. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies. Am J Hum Genet. 2015 May 7;96(5):816-25.

PubMed ID: 
25865493

PEHO-Like Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Poor visual fixation and attention has been noted during the first 6 months of life.  Optic atrophy has been described and epicanthal folds may be present.

Systemic Features: 

General hypotonia with developmental delay and progressive microcephaly are evident in the first 6-12 months of life.  Seizures may be present at birth or within the first month of life.  Edema of the feet, hands, and face are also present at birth.  Cognitive deficits and motor delays are usually evident during infancy.  The central hypotonia may be accompanied by peripheral spasticity.  Kyphoscoliosis often develops.  Other dysmorphic features include micrognathia, narrow forehead, short nose, and open mouth.

Brain imaging reveals coarse pachygyria, polymicrogyria, and dilated ventricles with hypoplastic corpus callosum and pons.  Cerebellar hypoplasia was found in one child. 

Genetics

This presumed autosomal recessive disorder is associated with homozygous mutations in the CCDC88A gene (2p16.1).  Three affected children have been reported in a consanguineous family.

A somewhat similar disorder known as PEHO syndrome (260565) results from homozygous mutations in the ZNHIT3 gene. 

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

The PEHO syndrome

Riikonen R. The PEHO syndrome. Brain Dev. 2001 Nov;23(7):765-9. Review.

PubMed ID: 
11701291

Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia 7

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

The ocular phenotype has not been fully evaluated.  Optic atrophy, nystagmus, and strabismus have been reported in addition to dysmorphic periocular features such as epicanthal folds, upslanting lid fissures, and a flattened nasal bridge.  Infants frequently do not fix and follow.

Systemic Features: 

Infants may be small at birth and subsequent psychomotor development is delayed.  The ears are large and the palate is highly arched.  Hypotonia is present from birth but spasticity with hyperreflexia may also be seen.  Brain imaging may show a thin corpus callosum as well as olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia.  The ventricles are frequently enlarged.  Patients are frequently irritable with few spontaneous movements.

Genitalia can be ambiguous and are frequently assigned to the female gender because of microphallus, fused scrotum, absent testes, and absence of the uterus.  Many such infants are found to have XY karyotypes.  Infants considered male at birth may subsequently show regression of penile corporeal tissue and may have genitalia that more closely resemble the female gender.  Pelvic imaging and laparoscopy, however, may reveal a uterus, Fallopian tubes and a blind-ending vagina with no gonadal tissue even in individuals with XY karyotypes. 

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the TOE1 gene (1p34.1) are responsible for this condition.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic mutations in the 3' exonuclease TOE1 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia and uncover a role in snRNA processing

Lardelli RM, Schaffer AE, Eggens VR, Zaki MS, Grainger S, Sathe S, Van Nostrand EL, Schlachetzki Z, Rosti B, Akizu N, Scott E, Silhavy JL, Heckman LD, Rosti RO, Dikoglu E, Gregor A, Guemez-Gamboa A, Musaev D, Mande R, Widjaja A, Shaw TL, Markmiller S, Marin-Valencia I, Davies JH, de Meirleir L, Kayserili H, Altunoglu U, Freckmann ML, Warwick L, Chitayat D, Blaser S, Caglayan AO, Bilguvar K, Per H, Fagerberg C, Christesen HT, Kibaek M, Aldinger KA, Manchester D, Matsumoto N, Muramatsu K, Saitsu H, Shiina M, Ogata K, Foulds N, Dobyns WB, Chi NC, Traver D, Spaccini L, Bova SM, Gabriel SB, Gunel M, Valente EM, Nassogne MC, Bennett EJ, Yeo GW, Baas F, Lykke-Andersen J, Gleeson JG. Biallelic mutations in the 3' exonuclease TOE1 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia and uncover a role in snRNA processing. Nat Genet. 2017 Mar;49(3):457-464.

PubMed ID: 
28092684

Muscular Dystrophy, Congenital, with Cataracts and Intellectual Disability

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Cataracts have been diagnosed by 6 months of age and may be congenital in origin. Several patients have had strabismus.

Systemic Features: 

Progressive muscle weakness begins in early childhood.  Hypotonia is usually present at birth followed by atrophy of the proximal muscles (especially in the lower limbs).  Muscle weakness progresses for several years and may stabilize but not before severe gait difficulties occur.  Most adult patients are confined to a wheelchair.  No cardiac involvement occurs although respiratory weakness is often present.  Serum creatine kinase is usually elevated and biopsied muscle fibers show dystrophic changes and increased variability in fiber size with vacuolization.

Other signs in some individuals are contractures, scoliosis, seizures, short stature, cognitive deficits (usually mild), and spinal rigidity.  Paradoxically, some patients have limb spasticity and hyperreflexia with pyramidal signs.  No cerebellar signs are present.

Genetics

This condition results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the INPP5K gene (17p13).  

See Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome for a disorder with a somewhat similar clinical presentation plus cerebellar signs.  It is caused by a different mutation, however.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Cataracts have been surgically removed in several patients by the age of two years.  Physical therapy may be beneficial.  Selected individuals could benefit from release of contractures.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in INPP5K, Encoding a Phosphoinositide 5-Phosphatase, Cause Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Cataracts and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Wiessner M, Roos A, Munn CJ, Viswanathan R, Whyte T, Cox D, Schoser B, Sewry C, Roper H, Phadke R, Marini Bettolo C, Barresi R, Charlton R, Bonnemann CG, Abath Neto O, Reed UC, Zanoteli E, Araujo Martins Moreno C, Ertl-Wagner B, Stucka R, De Goede C, Borges da Silva T, Hathazi D, Dell'Aica M, Zahedi RP, Thiele S, Muller J, Kingston H, Muller S, Curtis E, Walter MC, Strom TM, Straub V, Bushby K, Muntoni F, Swan LE, Lochmuller H, Senderek J. Mutations in INPP5K, Encoding a Phosphoinositide 5-Phosphatase, Cause Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Cataracts and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Mar 2;100(3):523-536.

PubMed ID: 
28190456

Mutations in INPP5K Cause a Form of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Overlapping Marinesco-Sjögren Syndrome and Dystroglycanopathy

Osborn DP, Pond HL, Mazaheri N, Dejardin J, Munn CJ, Mushref K, Cauley ES, Moroni I, Pasanisi MB, Sellars EA, Hill RS, Partlow JN, Willaert RK, Bharj J, Malamiri RA, Galehdari H, Shariati G, Maroofian R, Mora M, Swan LE, Voit T, Conti FJ, Jamshidi Y, Manzini MC. Mutations in INPP5K Cause a Form of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Overlapping Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome and Dystroglycanopathy. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Mar 2;100(3):537-545.

PubMed ID: 
28190459

Encephalopathy, Progressive, with Amyotrophy and Optic Atrophy

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy is present.

Systemic Features: 

This is a progressive neurodegenerative condition in which hypotonia and delayed development are evident between birth and 14 months of age.  Developmental milestones, if attained, soon regress accompanied by distal amyotrophy, cognitive impairment that may be severe, ataxia, spastic tetraplegia, dysarthria, and scoliosis.  Seizures often occur.

Brain imaging reveals cerebellar and cerebral atrophy.  Iron accumulation may be seen in the pallidum and substantia nigra.  The corpus callosum appears abnormally thin.  Muscle biopsy shows evidence of denervation atrophy.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the TBCE gene (1q42.3) can cause this disorder.  

Biallelic mutations in the same gene also cause Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (244460) and a hypoparathyroidism dysmorphism syndrome (241410).

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

TBCE Mutations Cause Early-Onset Progressive Encephalopathy with Distal Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Sferra A, Baillat G, Rizza T, Barresi S, Flex E, Tasca G, D'Amico A, Bellacchio E, Ciolfi A, Caputo V, Cecchetti S, Torella A, Zanni G, Diodato D, Piermarini E, Niceta M, Coppola A, Tedeschi E, Martinelli D, Dionisi-Vici C, Nigro V, Dallapiccola B, Compagnucci C, Tartaglia M, Haase G, Bertini E. TBCE Mutations Cause Early-Onset Progressive Encephalopathy with Distal Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Oct 6;99(4):974-983.

PubMed ID: 
27666369

Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy

Flex E, Niceta M, Cecchetti S, Thiffault I, Au MG, Capuano A, Piermarini E, Ivanova AA, Francis JW, Chillemi G, Chandramouli B, Carpentieri G, Haaxma CA, Ciolfi A, Pizzi S, Douglas GV, Levine K, Sferra A, Dentici ML, Pfundt RR, Le Pichon JB, Farrow E, Baas F, Piemonte F, Dallapiccola B, Graham JM Jr, Saunders CJ, Bertini E, Kahn RA, Koolen DA, Tartaglia M. Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Oct 6;99(4):962-973.

PubMed ID: 
27666370

Epileptic Encephalopathy, Early Infantile 48

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Poor eye contact is present from infancy.  Optic atrophy has been reported in several patients and features of retinitis pigmentosa were present in sibs of one family.

Systemic Features: 

Infants usually present with hypotonia and feeding difficulties.  Global developmental delay is also noted early and becomes more obvious with time.  Seizures are often seen early and become intractable.  Many individuals have microcephaly.  Hypermobility with dyskinesias and hyporeflexia are often present.  Speech is generally absent and many individuals are unable to sit or walk.

Brain imaging often shows atrophy of the cerebrum and cerebellum accompanied by enlarged ventricles and a thin corpus callosum.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the AP3B2 gene (15q25.2) can be responsible for this condition.

For another somewhat similar condition see early onset epileptic encephalopathy 28 (616211) with autosomal recessive inheritance.  For an autosomal dominant condition with a similar clinical picture, see early onset epileptic encephalopathy 47 (617166).

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in AP3B2, Adaptor-Related Protein Complex 3 Beta 2 Subunit, Cause an Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy with Optic Atrophy

Assoum M, Philippe C, Isidor B, Perrin L, Makrythanasis P, Sondheimer N, Paris C, Douglas J, Lesca G, Antonarakis S, Hamamy H, Jouan T, Duffourd Y, Auvin S, Saunier A, Begtrup A, Nowak C, Chatron N, Ville D, Mireskandari K, Milani P, Jonveaux P, Lemeur G, Milh M, Amamoto M, Kato M, Nakashima M, Miyake N, Matsumoto N, Masri A, Thauvin-Robinet C, Riviere JB, Faivre L, Thevenon J. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in AP3B2, Adaptor-Related Protein Complex 3 Beta 2 Subunit, Cause an Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy with Optic Atrophy. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Dec 1;99(6):1368-1376.

PubMed ID: 
27889060

Clinical genomics expands the morbid genome of intellectual disability and offers a high diagnostic yield

Anazi S, Maddirevula S, Faqeih E, Alsedairy H, Alzahrani F, Shamseldin HE, Patel N, Hashem M, Ibrahim N, Abdulwahab F, Ewida N, Alsaif HS, Al Sharif H, Alamoudi W, Kentab A, Bashiri FA, Alnaser M, AlWadei AH, Alfadhel M, Eyaid W, Hashem A, Al Asmari A, Saleh MM, AlSaman A, Alhasan KA, Alsughayir M, Al Shammari M, Mahmoud A, Al-Hassnan ZN, Al-Husain M, Osama Khalil R, Abd El Meguid N, Masri A, Ali R, Ben-Omran T, El Fishway P, Hashish A, Ercan Sencicek A, State M, Alazami AM, Salih MA, Altassan N, Arold ST, Abouelhoda M, Wakil SM, Monies D, Shaheen R, Alkuraya FS. Clinical genomics expands the morbid genome of intellectual disability and offers a high diagnostic yield. Mol Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 19. doi: 10.1038/mp.2016.113. [Epub ahead of print].

PubMed ID: 
27431290

Encephalopathy, Early-Onset, With Brain Atrophy and Thin Corpus Callosum

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy is present in many patients and may be present early since lack of visual tracking or eye contact may be noted at birth.  Sparse eyebrows, upslanting palpebral fissures, and hypertelorism have also been reported.

Systemic Features: 

Severe hypotonia is present at birth often causing respiratory distress in the neonate.  Spasticity can develop later.  Growth failure with progressive microcephaly is present in infants.  Brain imaging often reveals diffuse atrophy of structures including the cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebrum.  Tongue fasciculations have been observed.   Micrognathia and widely spaced teeth are sometimes present.  Several patients have died during infancy.

Genetics

Homozygous mutations in the TBCD (17q25.3) are responsible for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy

Flex E, Niceta M, Cecchetti S, Thiffault I, Au MG, Capuano A, Piermarini E, Ivanova AA, Francis JW, Chillemi G, Chandramouli B, Carpentieri G, Haaxma CA, Ciolfi A, Pizzi S, Douglas GV, Levine K, Sferra A, Dentici ML, Pfundt RR, Le Pichon JB, Farrow E, Baas F, Piemonte F, Dallapiccola B, Graham JM Jr, Saunders CJ, Bertini E, Kahn RA, Koolen DA, Tartaglia M. Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Oct 6;99(4):962-973.

PubMed ID: 
27666370

Biallelic TBCD Mutations Cause Early-Onset Neurodegenerative Encephalopathy

Miyake N, Fukai R, Ohba C, Chihara T, Miura M, Shimizu H, Kakita A, Imagawa E, Shiina M, Ogata K, Okuno-Yuguchi J, Fueki N, Ogiso Y, Suzumura H, Watabe Y, Imataka G, Leong HY, Fattal-Valevski A, Kramer U, Miyatake S, Kato M, Okamoto N, Sato Y, Mitsuhashi S, Nishino I, Kaneko N, Nishiyama A, Tamura T, Mizuguchi T, Nakashima M, Tanaka F, Saitsu H, Matsumoto N. Biallelic TBCD Mutations Cause Early-Onset Neurodegenerative Encephalopathy. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Oct 6;99(4):950-961.

PubMed ID: 
27666374

Intellectual Disability with Dysmorphic Facies and Ptosis

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

The eyes appear widely spaced and the lid fissures slant downward.  Ptosis and blepharophimosis are present.  Strabismus is an uncommon feature.

Systemic Features: 

The characteristic facial profile (round, flat) is evident at birth. Microcephaly has been seen in some children.  Low birthweight is common.  Most infants feed poorly with general growth delay and short stature becoming evident in childhood.  Hypotonia and joint hypermobility are constant features.  Gross and fine motor movements appear uncoordinated.  Expressive language is delayed and impaired.  Intellectual disability is mild and achievement of developmental milestones may be delayed.  Seizures are seen in about half of affected individuals.  Brain MRIs may reveal mild white matter anomalies.  Spinal fusion among cervical vertebrae is common.

Individuals may live to adulthood.

Genetics

Heterozygous mutations in the BRPF1 gene (3p25) are responsible for this condition.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No effective treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in Histone Acetylase Modifier BRPF1 Cause an Autosomal-Dominant Form of Intellectual Disability with Associated Ptosis

Mattioli F, Schaefer E, Magee A, Mark P, Mancini GM, Dieterich K, Von Allmen G, Alders M, Coutton C, van Slegtenhorst M, Vieville G, Engelen M, Cobben JM, Juusola J, Pujol A, Mandel JL, Piton A. Mutations in Histone Acetylase Modifier BRPF1 Cause an Autosomal-Dominant Form of Intellectual Disability with Associated Ptosis. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Jan 5;100(1):105-116.

PubMed ID: 
27939639

Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation

Yan K, Rousseau J, Littlejohn RO, Kiss C, Lehman A, Rosenfeld JA, Stumpel CT, Stegmann AP, Robak L, Scaglia F, Nguyen TT, Fu H, Ajeawung NF, Camurri MV, Li L, Gardham A, Panis B, Almannai M, Sacoto MJ, Baskin B, Ruivenkamp C, Xia F, Bi W; DDD Study.; CAUSES Study., Cho MT, Potjer TP, Santen GW, Parker MJ, Canham N, McKinnon M, Potocki L, MacKenzie JJ, Roeder ER, Campeau PM, Yang XJ. Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Jan 5;100(1):91-104.

PubMed ID: 
27939640

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