dystonia

Leukodystrophy, Hypomyelinating, 15

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Severe optic atrophy with marked vision loss is commonly present.  Hypermetropia and nystagmus have also been reported.

Systemic Features: 

The clinical features of 4 unrelated patients are highly variable.  Onset of clinical signs is also variable and most are progressive.   Several patients have presented in the first month of life with microcephaly and delayed motor development.  Progressive cerebellar signs of ataxia with dystonia, dysphagia and motor signs from infancy has been seen.  Other patients with cognitive deterioration and progressive neurologic deficits may present late in the first decade of life at which time ataxia, dysarthria, spasticity, and pyramidal signs nay also be noted.  Dystonic and athetoid movements and intention tremor have been reported in some patients.

Brain MRIs in older individuals in the second decade of life reveal hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with thinning of the corpus callosum and cerebellar atrophy.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the EPRS (1q41) gene are responsible for this autosomal recessive disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

Epileptic Encephalopathy, Infantile or Early Childhood 2

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Cortical visual impairment or blindness was reported in 3 0f 11 patients.

Systemic Features: 

The hallmark signs of this disorder consist of developmental delay and epilepsy.  Onset of seizures occur in the first decade of life, between birth and 6 years, and consist of a variety of types including focal, multifocal, generalized tonic-clonic, febrile, myoclonic, and atonic.  EEG patterns range from normal, to slow waves, spike waves, and burst suppression patterns.  Seizures may respond to treatment in some individuals whereas others are unresponsive.

Microcephaly, both acquired and congenital, was seen in 7 individuals.  MRI scans are usually normal but some patients have nonspecific white matter abnormalities.  Developmental milestones are seldom achieved but some patients are able to walk and speak with difficulty.   Hypotonia, spasticity, and dyskinesias such as myoclonia, dystonia and ataxia are variably present.

Genetics

Heterozygous missense mutations in the GABRB2 gene (5q34) are responsible for this syndrome.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment for the general condition has been reported.  Seizures may not respond to the usual pharmacologic treatments.

References
Article Title: 

High Rate of Recurrent De Novo Mutations in Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathies

Hamdan FF, Myers CT, Cossette P, Lemay P, Spiegelman D, Laporte AD, Nassif C, Diallo O, Monlong J, Cadieux-Dion M, Dobrzeniecka S, Meloche C, Retterer K, Cho MT, Rosenfeld JA, Bi W, Massicotte C, Miguet M, Brunga L, Regan BM, Mo K, Tam C, Schneider A, Hollingsworth G; Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study, FitzPatrick DR, Donaldson A, Canham N, Blair E, Kerr B, Fry AE, Thomas RH, Shelagh J, Hurst JA, Brittain H, Blyth M, Lebel RR, Gerkes EH, Davis-Keppen L, Stein Q, Chung WK, Dorison SJ, Benke PJ, Fassi E, Corsten-Janssen N, Kamsteeg EJ, Mau-Them FT, Bruel AL, Verloes A, Ounap K, Wojcik MH, Albert DVF, Venkateswaran S, Ware T, Jones D, Liu YC, Mohammad SS, Bizargity P, Bacino CA, Leuzzi V, Martinelli S, Dallapiccola B, Tartaglia M, Blumkin L, Wierenga KJ, Purcarin G, O'Byrne JJ, Stockler S, Lehman A, Keren B, Nougues MC, Mignot C, Auvin S, Nava C, Hiatt SM, Bebin M, Shao Y, Scaglia F, Lalani SR, Frye RE, Jarjour IT, Jacques S, Boucher RM, Riou E, Srour M, Carmant L, Lortie A, Major P, Diadori P, Dubeau F, D'Anjou G, Bourque G, Berkovic SF, Sadleir LG, Campeau PM, Kibar Z, Lafreniere RG, Girard SL, Mercimek-Mahmutoglu S, Boelman C, Rouleau GA, Scheffer IE, Mefford HC, Andrade DM, Rossignol E, Minassian BA, Michaud JL. High Rate of Recurrent De Novo Mutations in Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathies. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Nov 2;101(5):664-685.

 

PubMed ID: 
291000083

Neurodevelopmental Disorder, Mitochondrial, with Abnormal Movements and Lactic Acidosis

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy is sometimes present.  Nystagmus, and strabismus are seen in some patients.  A pigmentary retinopathy was found in one individual.

Systemic Features: 

This is a clinically heterogeneous disorder with extensive neurological deficits.  Patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties from the neonatal period.  There is intrauterine growth retardation and postnatally patients usually exhibit psychomotor delays and intellectual disabilities.  Some develop seizures and few achieve normal developmental milestones.  Axial hypotonia is present from early infancy and most patients have muscle weakness and atrophy.  However, there may be spastic quadriplegia which is often associated with dysmetria, tremor, and athetosis.  Ataxia eventually develops in most patients. 

Brain imaging shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, enlarged ventricles, white matter defects, and delayed myelination. 

Incomplete metabolic studies suggest there may be abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity in at least some tissues.  Most patients have an elevated serum lactate.

Death in childhood is common.

Genetics

Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the WARS2 gene have been found in several families with this condition.  The considerable variation in the phenotype may at least partially be explained by the fact that an additional variant in the W13G gene is sometimes present which impairs normal localization of the WARS2 gene product within mitochondria.

The transmission pattern in several families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported for the general condition.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic variants in WARS2 encoding mitochondrial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthase in six individuals with mitochondrial encephalopathy

Wortmann SB, Timal S, Venselaar H, Wintjes LT, Kopajtich R, Feichtinger RG, Onnekink C, Muhlmeister M, Brandt U, Smeitink JA, Veltman JA, Sperl W, Lefeber D, Pruijn G, Stojanovic V, Freisinger P, V Spronsen F, Derks TG, Veenstra-Knol HE, Mayr JA, Rotig A, Tarnopolsky M, Prokisch H, Rodenburg RJ. Biallelic variants in WARS2 encoding mitochondrial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthase in six individuals with mitochondrial encephalopathy. Hum Mutat. 2017 Dec;38(12):1786-1795.

PubMed ID: 
28905505

Combined Oxidative Phosphorylation Deficiency 32

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Ocular signs are common but variable.  Patients may not make eye contact and sometimes have disconjugate eye movements.  Strabismus (usually exotropia) and nystagmus or often present.

Systemic Features: 

Six patients from 4 unrelated families of mixed ethnic backgrounds have been reported.  Infants within the first 4 to 6 months of life had evidence of developmental delay and neurodevelopmental regression.  Poor feeding and breathing difficulties are often noted in this period.  Other later signs are axial hypotonia, abnormal movements such as tremor, spasticity, hyperkinetic movements, dystonia with eventual regression of milestones.  Joint contractures and kyphoscoliosis may develop. 

Microcephaly was noted in several infants and brain imaging in all patients reveals abnormal T2- weighted signals in the brainstem and specifically in the basal ganglia.  Decreased activity in muscle mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, and IV has been documented.  Lactate may be increased in serum and the CSF.  Postmortem studies show brain vascular proliferation and gliosis in basal structures.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in MRPS34 (16p13.3) are the basis for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Biallelic Mutations in MRPS34 Lead to Instability of the Small Mitoribosomal Subunit and Leigh Syndrome

Lake NJ, Webb BD, Stroud DA, Richman TR, Ruzzenente B, Compton AG, Mountford HS, Pulman J, Zangarelli C, Rio M, Bodaert N, Assouline Z, Sherpa MD, Schadt EE, Houten SM, Byrnes J, McCormick EM, Zolkipli-Cunningham Z, Haude K, Zhang Z, Retterer K, Bai R, Calvo SE, Mootha VK, Christodoulou J, Rotig A, Filipovska A, Cristian I, Falk MJ, Metodiev MD, Thorburn DR. Biallelic Mutations in MRPS34 Lead to Instability of the Small Mitoribosomal Subunit and Leigh Syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Aug 3;101(2):239-254.

PubMed ID: 
28777931

Encephalopathy, Progressive, Early-Onset, wtih Brain Atrophy and Spasticity

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy or cortical visual impairment with lack of visual tracking have been described in all patients.

Systemic Features: 

Microcephaly is evident at birth with global developmental delay and hearing loss.  One patient of 3 reported in 2 unrelated families had brief flexion seizures at 5 months.  Developmental regression and stagnation may become evident within the first months of life.  The EEG showed a hypsarrhythmia pattern.  Truncal hypotonia, spasticity, dystonia and/or myoclonus, scoliosis, and dysphagia are also features.  Two of the three reported patients had seizures. 

Brain MRI showed a pattern of pontine hypoplasia, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, modified frontal gyri and diffuse cortical atrophy with enlarged ventricles have been described.  The cerebellum seems to be spared.

Genetics

Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the TRAPPC12 gene (2p25.3) were found in 3 children in 2 unrelated families with this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

Birk-Landau-Perez Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Patients have oculomotor apraxia, saccadic pursuits, lack of fixation, and ptosis.  No pigmentary changes were seen in the fundi but the optic nerves have not been described.

Systemic Features: 

This is a progressive disorder in which psychomotor regression and loss of speech develop by 1 to 2 years of age, often appearing as the first sign of abnormalities.  Cognitive impairment can progress to profound intellectual disability.  Older patients have limb and truncal ataxia and experience frequent falls.  Muscle tone in the limbs is increased and children often exhibit dyskinesia, dystonia, and axial hypotonia.  General muscle weakness is often present.  No abnormalities have been seen on brain imaging.

Some patients develop a nephropathy with renal insufficiency, hypertension, and hyperechogenic kidneys though deterioration of the renal disease is slow.  Renal biopsy in one patient revealed tubulointerstitial nephritis but no individuals have reached end-stage renal failure.

Genetics

Homozygous mutations in the SLC30A9 gene (4p13) are responsible for this disorder.  A single multigenerational consanguineous Bedouin family of 6 affected individuals has been reported with a transmission pattern consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment for the general disorder has been reported.  Electrolytes should be monitored and metabolic issues resulting from kidney malfunction may need to be addressed.

References
Article Title: 

Spastic Ataxia 8, Autosomal Recessive, with Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Reported ocular signs are limited to abnormal eye movements.  In other forms of spastic ataxia, nystagmus is evident in association with optic atrophy but no fundus examinations are reported in the 3 families with SPAX8.  Hypometric saccades and limited upgaze have also been found in these families.

Systemic Features: 

First signs and symptoms occur sometime in the first 5 years of life and often in the first year.   In 6 of 7 reported patients the presenting sign was nystagmus but one individual with reported onset of disease at age 5 years presented with ataxia.  Cerebellar signs, both truncal and limb, are usually present and the majority of individuals have evidence of dystonia.  Likewise, pyramidal signs are nearly always present.  Cerebellar dysarthria and titubation are often present with dystonic posturing and torticollis. 

Brain MRIs usually reveal cerebellar atrophy and widespread hypomyelination.  Two individuals in a single family had severe global psychomotor delays as well.  No sensory deficits were reported.  This disorder is progressive and patients in adulthood may require the use of a wheelchair.

Genetics

Homozygous mutations in the NKX6-2 (NKX6-2) gene (10q26.3) are responsible for this disorder.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported for the general condition.

References
Article Title: 

Mutations in NKX6-2 Cause Progressive Spastic Ataxia and Hypomyelination

Chelban V, Patel N, Vandrovcova J, Zanetti MN, Lynch DS, Ryten M, Botia JA, Bello O, Tribollet E, Efthymiou S, Davagnanam I; SYNAPSE Study Group, Bashiri FA, Wood NW, Rothman JE, Alkuraya FS, Houlden H. Mutations in NKX6-2 Cause Progressive Spastic Ataxia and Hypomyelination. Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Jun 1;100(6):969-977.

PubMed ID: 
28575651

Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

External ophthalmoplegia in some form is usually present and there may be a supranuclear component.  Smooth horizontal movements are impaired and saccades are dysmetric.  Gaze-evoked nystagmus is a common finding.  The eyes are often described as 'bulging' and this has been attributed to eyelid retraction.  With time the abnormal saccadic movements slow resulting in ophthalmoparesis with restriction of upgaze.

Systemic Features: 

This form of spinocerebellar ataxia is considered to be the most frequent.  It is a progressive disease in all aspects which accounts for some of the considerable clinical heterogeneity reported.  Onset is likewise highly variable depending upon the number of repeats but usually sometime between the second to fifth decades.  In a large cohort of Azorean individuals the mean age of onset was reported to be 37 years.

An unsteady gait, dysarthric speech, general clumsiness, and diplopia are among the early symptoms.  Nystagmus, spasticity, and various autonomic signs including reduced bladder control may also be noted.  Chronic pain, sleep disturbances, impaired mental functioning, and memory deficits are often present and some authors have labelled these as indicative of dementia.

Virtually all clinical signs progress with ambulation difficulties requiring the need for assistive devices about a decade after the onset of disease.  Eventually signs of brain stem involvement appear with facial atrophy, perioral twitching, tongue fasciculations and atrophy, and dysphagia. Some degree of peripheral polyneuropathy with muscle wasting and loss of sensation are often present.  Tremors and other signs of Parkinsonism may be present.  Dystonic movements are often seen.

Imagining of the brain has revealed pontocerebellar atrophy and enlargement of the 4th ventricle but this is variable.  Nerve conduction studies documents involvement of the sensory nerves.  Neuropathologic studies show widespread neuronal loss in the CNS and spinal cord.

Genetics

This is considered to be an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an excess of heterozygous trinucleotide repeats in the ataxin3 gene (14q32) encoding glutamine.  The number in normal individuals is up to 44 repeats whereas patients with SCA3 have 52-86 repeats.  However, clinical signs of SCA3 have been found in patients with as few as 45 glutamine repeats.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal dominant
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

Physical and occupational therapy combined with regular exercise has been reported to slow the progression of symptoms.

References
Article Title: 

Machado-Joseph disease

Sudarsky L, Coutinho P. Machado-Joseph disease. Clin Neurosci. 1995;3(1):17-22. Review.

PubMed ID: 
7614089

Kufor-Rakeb Syndrome

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Most patients have a supranuclear gaze paresis.  Patients later may have dystonic oculogyric spasms.

Systemic Features: 

This is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with juvenile onset.  First signs of Parkinisonism are evident between the ages of 12 and 16 years of age.  Within a year of onset severe motor handicaps develop along with some degree of dementia with aggression and visual hallucinations.  Cognitive decline is often a feature.  Fine tremors in the chin may be seen along with other extrapyramidal signs but these are not prominent in the limbs.  Instead there is often rigidity and bradykinesia.  Dysphagia, dysarthria, and ataxia are features in many patients.  Peripheral sensory neuropathy and anosmia are present in some individuals. 

Brain imaging often reveals generalized atrophy of the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and brainstem.

Genetics

This condition results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP13A2 gene (1p36.13).  

Biallelic mutations in the same gene are also responsible for spastic paraplegia 78 (617225) with somewhat similar clinical features except for the general absence of Parkinsonism.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

There may be an initial therapeutic response to L-DOPA but this is often not maintained

References
Article Title: 

Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78)

Estrada-Cuzcano A, Martin S, Chamova T, Synofzik M, Timmann D, Holemans T, Andreeva A, Reichbauer J, De Rycke R, Chang DI, van Veen S, Samuel J, Schols L, Poppel T, Mollerup Sorensen D, Asselbergh B, Klein C, Zuchner S, Jordanova A, Vangheluwe P, Tournev I, Schule R. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78). Brain. 2017 Feb;140(Pt 2):287-305.

PubMed ID: 
28137957

Dystonia, Childhood Onset, With Optic Atrophy

Clinical Characteristics
Ocular Features: 

Optic atrophy is often observed during the first decade of life and has been noted as early as 15 months.  It may be congenital.  Nystagmus has been seen in some patients.

Systemic Features: 

Signs of motor dysfunction are seen in the first decade of life, and as early as 15 months of age.  Motor development may be mildly delayed.  Features are variable and include facial dystonia, myoclonus, dyskinesia, dysarthria, dysphagia, limb spasticity, and chorea-like movements all of which may progress.  Some patients lose independent ambulation but cognition is not affected.

Brain imaging reveals hyperintense T2-weighted signals in the basal ganglia.

Genetics

The transmission pattern in 5 reported families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.  Biallelic mutations in the MECR gene (1p35) have been found in 7 affected individuals.

This nuclear gene plays a role in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis.

Pedigree: 
Autosomal recessive
Treatment
Treatment Options: 

No treatment has been reported.

References
Article Title: 

MECR Mutations Cause Childhood-Onset Dystonia and Optic Atrophy, a Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis Disorder

Heimer G, Keratar JM, Riley LG, Balasubramaniam S, Eyal E, Pietikainen LP, Hiltunen JK, Marek-Yagel D, Hamada J, Gregory A, Rogers C, Hogarth P, Nance MA, Shalva N, Veber A, Tzadok M, Nissenkorn A, Tonduti D, Renaldo F; University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics., Kraoua I, Panteghini C, Valletta L, Garavaglia B, Cowley MJ, Gayevskiy V, Roscioli T, Silberstein JM, Hoffmann C, Raas-Rothschild A, Tiranti V, Anikster Y, Christodoulou J, Kastaniotis AJ, Ben-Zeev B, Hayflick SJ. MECR Mutations Cause Childhood-Onset Dystonia and Optic Atrophy, a Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis Disorder. Am J Hum Genet. 2016 Dec 1;99(6):1229-1244.

PubMed ID: 
27817865

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